How To Dry Out (and Hopefully Save) Wet Electronics


2010HomeHackspostBadge.jpgCell phones, mp3 players, GPS units, gaming handhelds…we often travel with these invaluable digital companions wherever we go. The trade-off is you’ve always got something to worry about. How many of us have found ourselves losing our beloved cell phone? Or worse, dropped and broken a handheld device. Possibly the worst “Oh #$@&!” moment is dropping something into water, as this seems to practically guarantee you’re buying a replacement. But if you’re quick enough, you may be able to throw one last Hail Mary and revive your digital device from the brink of death.

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What You Need

Equipment
1 small deep depth bowl
1-2 cups of rice
Rubbing alcohol
Anti-static cleaning cloth (1 of our 8 essentials)

Instructions

1. First thing you want to do is remove/disassemble any removable parts, most significantly the battery unit. Taking your device apart will allow you for easier and quicker drying, since the first thing you want to do is remove any surface moisture. Use an anti-static cleaning cloth like the ones used by photographers, which not only prevents any electrical damage, but won’t leave any residue.

2. Fill a deep cereal or soup bowl with rice. Any rice will do, but white rice will probably work the best since the hull has been removed, which allows for better moisture sucking powers (we’re a brown-rice household, so we had to make due). Place your device, off/disassembled inside the bowl, with all parts covered and leave overnight.

3. By morning, your device should be mostly dry inside and out. But to really make sure you’ve removed all moisture, you’re going to do something seemingly crazy: you’re going to soak your device in rubbing alcohol. This will help expedite the removal any lingering moisture within your device.

4. Leave device 1-3 days to completely dry in a moderate temperature, low humidity environment. If you’re lucky, after this dry out time, you’ll be able to power up your device and invest in a waterproof case and an extended warranty.

Source: Apartmenttherapy.com

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Got $400K To Spend On a Week's Vacation

necker_nymph_sub.top.jpg

Im sure Jay & Bey may be the first to take Richard up on this offer!

Branson goes 20,000 leagues under the sea

By Blake Ellis, staff reporter

February 4, 2010: 7:43 AM ET NEW YORK (CNNMoney.com) — Virgin unveiled the latest addition to Richard Branson’s luxury fleet on Friday: an underwater plane that will fly riders into the depths of the Caribbean Sea. Guests on Necker Island, a retreat in the British Virgin Islands, will be able to dive underwater in a submarine dubbed the Necker Nymph for $25,000 a week. But that’s only after shelling out around $300,000 for a one-week stay on Necker, the private island owned by billionaire and Virgin Group chairman Richard Branson.  

 Beginning on Feb. 20, two riders and a pilot will be able to take the plunge from land or from a boat. The underwater plane uses the downward pressure on its wings to fly through the water for up to two hours at a time, while an open cockpit will give riders a 360-degree view. The Necker Nymph’s typical speed is 2 to 5 nautical miles per hour and it can dive more than 100 feet, said Karen Hawkes, a spokeswoman for Hawkes Ocean Technologies, the company that designed the Nymph. A statement released Friday by Virgin Limited Edition, the luxury arm of Virgin Hotels, described the Nymph’s launch like a plane’s takeoff. “Gliding on the water’s surface like an aeroplane on a runway, one of the three pilots will operate the joystick to smoothly dive down.” Vacationers will be able to fly the Necker Nymph while chartering the Necker Belle, Branson’s 105-foot yacht, or the submarine can be launched from shore. Necker Belle is rented out to guests for $88,000 a week, bringing the full Necker Island experience to more than $400,000 per week.

Underwater flight Riders must follow SCUBA procedures and be trained or accompanied by a certified pilot before entering the underwater plane. SCUBA tanks are mounted in the submarine and passengers must wear masks while underwater, said Hawkes. The Necker Nymph claims “near-zero” environmental impact because its “positive buoyancy prevents the sub from landing on a reef, and its low light and noise emissions ensure the fragile ocean ecosystems remain undisturbed,” Virgin said.